Path of Meditation


The practice of meditation is basically a process of getting to know yourself by becoming familiar with your mind. The Buddhist view of the mind is that it’s always awake. Its nature is awareness and compassion.

Whatever meditation practices we may do, they are all intended to increase our mindfulness and awareness, strengthen our sense of inner peace, and improve our ability to deal with our emotions as well. — Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

Nalandabodhi Halifax offers a 5 week Beginning Meditation course periodically throughout the year.  To find out about the next Beginning Meditation course, leave a message at halifax@nalandabodhi.ca

Learn how to meditate and more about the Path of Meditation.

Nalandabodhi Halifax offers regular group practice (below). Everyone is welcome.

Shamatha Meditation

Sundays 10:00am  -  See calendar for dates

Sometimes known as “bare attention” or “peaceful abiding” Shamatha practice begins with chants and then alternates sitting and walking meditation.  The practice of meditation is basically a process of getting to know yourself by becoming familiar with your mind.  The Buddhist view of the mind is that it’s always awake.  Its nature is awareness and compassion.  “Whatever meditation practices we may do, they are all intended to increase our mindfulness and awareness, strengthen our sense of inner peace, and improve our ability to deal with our emotions as well.” — Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

medium_429702209-150x150.jpgShamatha Meditation and Contemplation

Sometimes known as “bare attention” or “peaceful abiding” Shamatha practice begins with chants and then alternates sitting and walking meditation.  The practice of meditation is basically a process of getting to know yourself by becoming familiar with your mind.  Once our mind has a chance to settle, we will engage in some short contemplations and discussion.

milarepaShamatha Meditation and Songs of Realization

Sometimes known as “bare attention” or “peaceful abiding” Shamatha practice begins with chants and then alternates sitting and walking meditation. The practice of meditation is basically a process of getting to know yourself by becoming familiar with your mind. The Buddhist view of the mind is that it’s always awake. Its nature is awareness and compassion.

“Whatever meditation practices we may do, they are all intended to increase our mindfulness and awareness, strengthen our sense of inner peace, and improve our ability to deal with our emotions as well.” — Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

Following meditation, we’ll join in songs from  Khenpo Tsultrim Gyamtso Rinpoche’s Songs of Realization.

Tara Practice

According to tradition, Arya Tara was first incarnated as a royal princess who gave rise to the enlightened intention to benefit all sentient beings (bodhicitta).  By engaging in this practice, we visualize Tara as a means to open our own heart of compassion.
“If you are a person who has entered and is practicing the path, then supplicating Arya Tara helps dispel all obstacles you are facing that get in the way of making your practice fruitional.  Arya Tara also clears away obstacles of all those with whom we have connections, our friends, our relatives, our partners and so on, anyone for whom we wish that they be free of illness, negative spirits, and other obstacles.  When you supplicate Arya Tara you will receive her blessing.”   - Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche

Guru Rinpoche Practice

Guru Padmasambhava, who brought the Indian Buddhist tradition of Vajrayana to Tibet, is an example and symbol of our own innate potential for selflessness and compassion.  In this beautiful practice, we train in connecting our hearts and minds with Guru Padmasambhava and other lineage masters who continue to transmit these precious teachings.  A short introduction proceeds the practice to introduce the liturgy and meaning.   Guru Rinpoche practice follows a lunar calendar and the day on which this monthly celebration falls will vary.

Please check the calendar for practice dates and times.